A New Hampshire lake at sunset

Working for Clean & Healthy Lakes Webinar Series

Great news! Your NH LAKES Team continues working harder than ever for clean and healthy lakes these days. We’re pleased to announce another new program for summer 2020—the “Working for Clean & Healthy Lakes” webinar series!

New Hampshire is home to nearly 1,000 lakes and ponds. While our state boasts some of the cleanest and healthiest lakes in the country, they face many threats. Tune in and hear how biologists, nonprofit organizations, and volunteers are working together to monitor our lakes and keep them clean and healthy—and learn how you can help!

This four-part weekly series starts on Wednesday, July 8, 2020, at 7:00 p.m. These webinars are FREE, but pre-registration is required and space is limited. Read on below to find out more and to register!

Cyanobacteria Monitoring in New Hampshire’s Lakes: What You Need to Know & How You Can Help!

Wednesday, July 8, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Photo courtesy of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Service

You may have heard it in the news—toxic cyanobacteria blooms have already been seen in some of New Hampshire’s lakes this summer. Tune in to this session and find out what cyanobacteria is, what blooms look like, and what they tell us about the health of our lakes. You’ll also learn what is being done across the state to prevent and monitor for these harmful blooms and what to do if you think you’ve spotted one.

Presented by Amanda Murby McQuaid, Ph.D., Harmful Algal and Cyanobacteria Bloom Program, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

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Preventing the Spread of Invasive Species in New Hampshire’s Lakes

Wednesday, July 15, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Invasive species infestation

The good news is that the spread of invasive plants—like milfoil—from lake to lake in New Hampshire has slowed over the years. But, the bad news is, the spread of invasive animals—like the Asian clam and the Chinese mystery snail—in our lakes is on the rise. Tune in to this session to find out why invasive species are a problem and what is being done to prevent their spread—and how you can help!

Presented by Amy Smagula, Exotic Species Program Coordinator, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and Krystal Costa Balanoff, Conservation Program Coordinator, NH LAKES

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How Healthy are New Hampshire’s Lakes?

Wednesday, July 22, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Secchi disk in the water

New Hampshire is home to nearly 1,000 lakes and ponds. While our state boasts some of the cleanest and healthiest lakes in the country, ever wonder just how healthy they really are? Tune and in and hear from the biologists with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services about how lake health is monitored and what the data tells us about water quality trends. You’ll also find out how you can help monitor the health of our lakes and ponds!

Presented by Kirsten Nelson, Aquatic Ecologist, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and Dave Neils, Chief Aquatic Biologist, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

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New Hampshire Lake Trend Report: Status and trends of water quality indicators

Green SnowPro Information

Loon Monitoring & Recovery in New Hampshire

Wednesday, July 29, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Photo courtesy of the Loon Preservation Committee 1

The Common Loon is an iconic symbol of New Hampshire’s pristine lakes and ponds and an important part of New Hampshire’s natural character. They are also recognized as sentinels of environmental health because they are sensitive to contaminants in lakes and ponds. The Loon Preservation Committee (LPC) was created in 1975 because of concerns about dramatic declines in New Hampshire’s loon population. Attend this session and find out how loons are doing in New Hampshire today and how you can help LPC in their loon monitoring and recovery efforts.

Presented by Caroline Hughes, Outreach/Volunteer Coordinator, Loon Preservation Committee, and Harry Vogel, Senior Scientist and Executive Director, Loon Preservation Committee

The slides are not available for this session

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